My Online gaming experience


#2

…or you could mute them???


#3

That only fixes one problem out of many


#4

what other problems are there


#5

True, but on the other hand, only ONE person has the power to brush off such behavior and not let it get under their skin.

Short of that, there are numerous tools in place to help you tailor your online experience to your preferences.

My best advice is to make friends and always try to group with them. No friends? The new LFG system is excellent and I’ve only had good experiences so far.

And if none of the above works? Well, when it seems like there are knuckleheads at every party you go to, at some point you have to stop and ask, am I the knucklehead?


#6

Honestly dude, you are never going to “fix” them. Jerks are jerks. The best thing you can do for yourself is work on your own reaction to them. I have worked on mine a lot. I still get tilted but it’s a lot better than it used to be, and someday I think they won’t bother me at all. That’s the real fix.


(Tom Powers) #7

Hi Fabio,

It’s regretful to hear you’ve experienced negativity within our game. That’s unfortunate and just not cool. Unfortunately, in most multiplayer games that exist today there is a probable risk of encountering unpleasant players.

The Overwatch team is working hard to mitigate toxicity, encourage polite conduct, and foster a more positive community in-game. In the future, if negative players harass you, we’d recommend you report and mute those players in-question. This will alleviate stress and frustration from your experience and assist us in identifying these bad apples.

Blizzard (along with many other video game companies) has joined the Fair Play Alliance, a coalition of video game companies who share research and best practices with each other on how to combat disruptive behavior. We have a long way to go, but hopefully this effort will lead to something productive for the industry as a whole.

I’m sorry you had a poor experience, I wish you well.


#8

uh huh…


#9

Most accurate/spot-on comment I’ve read all week.

1999 RuneScape had almost all of the same conduct issues that OW has right now.

It isn’t the game’s fault. The element of voice chat mixed with the anonymity of the internet is what unfortunately allows toxic behavior to thrive.


#10

This is always good to hear that you guys are pouring work into the matter.


#11

Plato understands the internet.
He wrote about it around 400 BC.
The book was the republic. The internet was Gyges ring.
h ttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_of_Gyges

Essentially the lesson is that “evil” people do these things because they can not be truly punished, as they are invisible. “Good” people never use invisibility because they know the power would corrupt them. The internet is one giant invisibility cloak, and it is corrupting all of us slowly.

Thanks for resisting the corruption.


#12

There is no way to stop people from being toxic. You can’t predict who and when someone will throw, shout racist or sexist remarks through their mics, etc etc. It just isn’t possible. Even if OW had the most stringent report/punishment system in the world, it would require that behavior to be present first because it’s not right or fair to punish for behavior that hasn’t happened.


#13

Quake 3 community was never toxic, i don’t think i’ve ever seen a single toxic person in my semi-pro Q3 “career” :wink: Early-to-mid 2000 CS was non toxic too. Then internet became fast and cheep and here we are now. Also in older games i never felt mad after losing game - if you lost duel to someone in Q3 it meant that fella put even more time and effort than you to become this good. Now you can lose to some RNG-P2WLOOTBOX-BROKENHERO and you feel like you were cheated, lol.

Mentality changed too, i had a friend who was much better than me and it took me about 150-200 duels to finally win a single map. Now ppl wanna instantly win games and if they don’t they come here and complain: “just bought game, placed silver and lost about 500 SR and fall down to bronze hur-dur”. They become frustrated and frustration leads to toxicity. They blame team, matchmaking, blizzard - but never think that actualy they’re simply bad at this game and they need to learn and practice.


#14

Good point. When i was on a 56k modem, and it was 1996 everyone was amazed, happy, and in awe of “the interweb”.

AND NOBODY EVER CALLED ME. What a great era.


#15

I’ve noticed that the quality of interactions online in general has fallen drastically ever since the internet became cheaper. Weird. It’s almost as if… nevermind… lol.

Prime example of the “new age” of gaming that included massive toxicity is when the Xbox 360 first launched. Remember the voice comms in Halo 3 public matches? I sure do. It was really something…glad I still to this day have old VODs of those. People on here think OW is bad…whew, they’re lucky they missed out on those days then.


#16

Sorry to hear about that, OP. Unfortunately, the Internet is a combination of things that make people think they can behave badly :cold_sweat:

If you want to take a break, you’re more than welcome to! Let the summer crowd have its fun, then come back afterwards


#17

Have you ever thought of Counter-Strike: Global Offensive way of reporting players. Where when someone reports someone, the case get’s sent to “Overwatch” where a player of Gold+ will be able to watch 1/2 or 1/3 of the match and determine through watching the player whether he’s cheating, toxic, throwing, etc. After maybe 1000+ see the case and about 90% of people agree the guy is throwing then that guy get’s banned for however long. You should check it out as I think it would be a great addition to combat toxicity and hackers.


#18

Thing is, if someone wants to be right and proper butt in an MMORPG, you are under no compulsion to be around them. You can mute them, block them, and never participate with them again.

In Overwatch doing that is a bannable offense and the game actively punishes you for it. Like, imagine being a black man and having a team of 5 guys join your team who then proceed to talk in VC about the final solution for the African race.

You can’t quit, that gets you punished. Turning off VC is a reportable offense for ‘refusing to communicate’.


#19

It’s OW, not the Daily Stormer. Even in my most toxic MMO/FPS matches/raids/etc…I’ve never heard that level of vitriol. That sounds more like the rhetoric you’d hear on a white supremacist forum, as opposed to a standard video game match.

Edit: If somebody was seriously behaving in a manner that terrible…most people (including myself) would likely just record it and send it in as a ticket, as opposed to using the standard report system. That type of rhetoric is likely to get you a permanent mute (if you’re talking about wanting groups exterminated/etc.)


#20

Monster Hunter is never toxic. Sure, you’ll get the odd people who cheat to get high tier armor or some guy who gives you crap about your weapon choice, but they are the exception by a large margin


#21

I was being hyperbolic on purpose, but if I had a nickle for the number of times I was called ‘worthless’ which is basically a milder version of being called a bundle of sticks?

Yeah.

Point’s still the same. Other games allow me to not have to interact with other players. I don’t suffer for it outside of maybe having to leave a group. They find someone else, no harm, no foul.

In Overwatch if I want to remove myself from a bad situation I have to concede that I’m getting a ‘leaver’ mark on my record, I can’t re-queue for another game, and everyone in the game I left is now incentivized to report me. And if this leads to an actual punishment, and I take it up with customer service?

We get told about how where there’s smoke, there’s fire so obviously I am the problem. Blizzard has both built a game that encourages bad behavior, and punishes people who don’t want to be around it, but doubles down by encouraging customer service reps to back up people who abuse the report system like a school yard bully who learns how to work the crowd to his defense.