Feedback: Hunters

I’ve been reading through the thoughtful feedback on here, and I really appreciate all the responses from Blizzard — it’s very helpful to know what the devs are thinking, and what they’re looking at.

And now, I would like to share my own feedback, along with a few notes that I’ve read on the Hunter forum. There are many excellent feedback threads on that forum; I will be referring to a few through my post, although I will be paraphrasing them.

Before I start, I want to lay out my premises, my intentions, and my approach. I am taking the devs at their word; when Dragonflight (DF) was first announced, a series of video interviews were shared with us. In one such interview, the devs emphasized that they are focusing on the class identity over the spec identity. This is the main premise I am operating from, and it is my intention to analyze the trees (including the class tree) in order to determine whether the class identity — and to a lesser extent, spec identity — is clear and easily seen, or not. Lastly, I am the sort of person who “looks at the big picture” — some people might would feel that I am missing the tree for the forest, but this is how I see things.

I will talk about a few things in my analysis of the trees: The nodes, the pathing, the themes, and lastly, I will compare and contrast the Hunter trees to other class trees. I will also cite other feedback threads, as I mentioned earlier.


Compare and Contrast: Hunter Talent Trees and the other Classes

I will start with the compare and contrast; I have complied numbers on all the talent trees currently available in Alpha and put them into collapsible sections; I will post this in the following post. A note before I begin, though — I counted the nodes on one half the week of August 2-8, and the other half the week of August 9-15. I acknowledge that by August 16, some of the numbers may be a little different, but the overall picture remains largely the same.

What I did was I counted the number of nodes in each tree — the general class tree, and the spec trees for each class. I counted how many nodes are in each tree, and I counted the multiple-point nodes (2-point and 3-point). The reason I did this was due to seeing quite a number of Hunters — on both the Alpha forum and the Hunter forum — expressing concern over “bloat” (the number of multiple-point nodes). I wanted to see if there was a legitimate cause behind their concern… and the numbers I found was quite interesting. There definitely are a few outliers. I will now share the numbers before addressing my own thoughts.

In this post, I will be sharing the end result of the numbers that I collected; if you want a more thorough break-down, please see my next post, which will be solely dedicated to sharing the numbers that I collected from counting each of the available tree (sans Monk and Demon Hunter, which did not yet have their Alpha trees at the time of this posting). Specifically, what I am sharing right now is the percentage of nodes that are multiple-point.

Death Knight Trees
Class tree — 9%
Frost tree — 29%
Blood tree — 31%
Unholy tree — 29%

Druid Trees
Class tree — 20%
Balance tree — 35%
Feral tree — 30%
Restoration tree — 33%
Guardian tree — 24%

Evoker Trees
Class tree — 20%
Preservation tree — 23%
Devastation tree — 28%

Hunter Trees
Class tree — 37%
Beast Mastery — 51%
Survival — 44%
Marksmanship — 35%

Mage Trees
Class tree — 38%
Frost tree — 29%
Arcane tree — 15%
Fire tree — 27%

Paladin Trees
Class tree — 20%
Retribution tree — 16%
Holy tree — 15%
Protection tree — 28%

Priest Trees
Class tree — 29%
Shadow tree — 24%
Discipline tree — 23%
Holy tree — 19%

Rogue Trees
Class tree — 24%
Subtlety tree — 14%
Assassination tree — 29%
Outlaw tree — 19%

Shaman Trees
Class tree —22%
Elemental tree — 25%
Enhancement tree — 21%
Restoration tree — 23%

Warlock Trees
Class tree — 33%
Affliction tree — 38%
Demonology tree — 30%
Destruction tree — 41%

Warrior Trees
Class tree — 9%
Protection tree — 11%
Fury tree — 13%
Arms tree — 10%

Several things immediately came to me when I first looked at the numbers I wrote down — there appears to be three different brackets of bloat (or, to use another term, “cost”). For the sake of clarity, I am labeling these three brackets as “Cheap,” “Middle,” and “Expensive.”

The trees which consists of 19% or less multiple-point nodes are “cheap.” The trees which consists of between 20% to 29% multiple-point nodes are “middle” (I have seen people refer to this as the ‘sweet spot’). Lastly, the trees which consists of 30% or more multiple-point nodes are “expensive.”

There are 11 specs which meet the “cheap” criteria:

  1. Warrior Class + DK Class trees — 9%
  2. Warrior Arms tree — 10%
  3. Warrior Prot tree — 11%
  4. Warrior Fury tree — 13%
  5. Rogue Sub tree — 14%
  6. Mage Arcane + Pally Holy trees — 15%
  7. Pally Ret tree — 16%
  8. Rogue Outlaw + Priest Holy trees — 19%

There are 20 specs which meet the “middle” (sweet spot) criteria:

  1. Druid Class/Evoker Class/Pally Class trees - 20%
  2. Shammy Enh tree — 21%
  3. Shammy Class tree — 22%
  4. Evoker Pres/Priest Disc/Shammy Resto trees — 23%
  5. Druid Guardian + Priest Shadow trees — 24%
  6. Shammy Ele tree — 25%
  7. Mage Fire tree — 27%
  8. Pally Prot + Evoker Dev trees — 28%
  9. Rogue Sin/Mage Frost/Priest Class/DK Frost/DK Unh trees — 29%

Lastly, there are 13 specs which meet the “expensive” criteria:

  1. Hunter BM tree — 51%
  2. Hunter SV tree — 44%
  3. Lock Destro tree — 41%
  4. Lock Aff + Mage Class trees — 38%
  5. Hunter Class tree — 37%
  6. Hunter MM + Druid Balance trees — 35%
  7. Druid Resto + Lock Class trees — 33%
  8. DK Blood tree — 31%
  9. Druid Feral + Lock Demo trees — 30%

I will now discuss my thoughts about these numbers.

The first thing which leapt out to me is the sheer difference between all four Warrior trees (which ranges from 9% to 13% for multiple-point nodes) and all four Hunter trees (which ranges from 35% to 51% for multiple-point nodes). The reason this is significant, because with a lower percentage of multiple-point nodes, the wider a player can cast their net — or in other words, the player can spec into more nodes in the tree; naturally, with a higher percentage of multiple-point nodes, the player is stuck with speccing into less nodes.

Another thing that struck me as unusual is that there are several clear outliers when we look at the big picture: Hunter, Warlock, and Warrior. Hunter and Warlock are the only classes in which all four of their talent trees are “expensive,” whereas Warrior is the only class in which all four of their trees are “cheap.” Druid, Rogue, and Paladin also stand out; with Druid, 3 out of 5 trees are “expensive,” whereas with Rogue and Paladin, 2 out of 4 trees are “cheap.”

(Death Knight and Mage are the only classes with trees in all three brackets. The rest are mostly in the “middle” brackets with one or two trees in either the “cheap” or “expensive” brackets, aside from the outliers that I mentioned.)

Lastly, I noticed that there are several trees in which half or more of their first tier is taken up by multiple-point nodes:

  1. Sin Rogue tree — the first tier has 9 nodes, and 5 nodes are multiple-point: 56%
  2. MM Hunter tree — the first tier has 11 nodes, and 6 nodes are multiple-point: 55%
  3. BM Hunter tree — the first tier has 12 nodes, and 6 nodes are multiple-point: 50%
  4. Feral Druid tree — the first tier has 9 nodes, and 4 nodes are multiple-point: 45%. The reason Feral get a mention is because 2 of the 4 nodes are three-point nodes.

As I have mentioned before, the higher number of multiple-point nodes in a tree means a player cannot talent into as many nodes. The first tier is important, since it gives a player the first impressions of a tree. When a player specs into a Fury Warrior, they are able to choose 8 out the 10 nodes in the first tier before unlocking the second tier. In comparison, a BM Hunter can only choose 5 to 6 nodes out of the 12 nodes in the first tier before unlocking the second tier. This can lead to a more frustrating experience for the player, especially if they have already seen the “cheap” trees.

Or, to look at this in another perspective: In order to reach the second tier, a Fury Warrior must choose which 2 nodes they are not taking, whereas a BM Hunter must choose which 6 to 7 nodes they are not taking. The penalty is much larger in trees with a higher prevalence of multiple-point nodes. The reason I used the specific word of “penalty” is because Blizzard has talked about the new talent trees as important for players “making meaningful choices.” However, it can be argued that the choices are not as meaningful for some class trees — as has been mentioned, with “cheap” trees, the players can snatch up many more nodes, whereas with the “expensive” trees, the players must choose which nodes would hurt the least to lose. The experience is quite different between the three brackets.

I understand that the trees cannot be perfectly equalized. However, I think that Blizzard could (and should) aspire for a better balance; with the three outliers (Hunter, Warlock, Warrior), they should aim to get at least 3 trees — ideally all four trees — into the “middle” bracket (between 20% to 29% for multiple-point nodes) — especially Hunter, with SV being at 44% and BM at 51%!


Thoughts on the Class Tree

While looking over the Hunter trees, I noticed several oddities; some of the posters have mentioned them, but I still wanted to put them all together into one post.

Firstly, when looking at the Hunter class tree, I noticed that there are several nodes that affects an ability that a player could take without taking the said ability.

For example, there is Tranquilizing Shot; a player could spec into Improved Tranq Shot without taking Tranq Shot — this is because a player could take unlock Improved Tranq Shot by pathing through Rejuvenating Wind.

Likewise, players could spec into Binding Shackles (which improves onto Binding Shot and Intimidation) without taking Binding Shot or Intimidation — this is possible by a player choosing Scatter Shot over Binding Shot, or Hi-Explosive Trap over Intimidation.

The location of some of the nodes seemed to be rather inconsistent; the trap nodes are a little scattered — Hi-Explosive Trap shares a choice node with Intimidation, despite sharing two very different roles (one is a knockback that does damage, while another is a stun). The node for reducing the cooldown of traps (Improved Traps) requires that a player spec into either Camouflage (stealth) or a choice node for two different versions of Survival of the Fittest (damage reduction). This node — Improved Traps — is on the other side of the tree when compared to Hi-Explosive Trap.

The next talents that directly impact traps are at the bottom — Nesingwary’s Trapping Apparatus and Steel Trap. Now, a player could technically path into those two nodes through Hi-Explosive Trap or Improved Traps — and they could just as easily path into those two third-tier trap nodes without the two trap nodes in the second tier. The reason I found this odd is because when I looked at the other class trees, I noticed that Blizzard has a tendency to lump nodes of the same category together. So I found it unusual that the trap nodes are so scattered throughout the Hunter class tree.

(The one trap-related node in which I thought the placement is decent is the Tar Trap; Tar Trap is required to reach the Hi-Explosive Trap node, which seemed appropriate to me. However, a player could reach the other trap nodes without taking Tar Trap.)

Another choice which seemed odd to me is the placement of Tranq Shot in the “pet side” (or pet path) of the tree. In order to take Tranq Shot, a player has two options: Spec into Tar Trap or Improved Pet Mend. The Tar Trap requirement makes sense, since Tar Trap and Tranq Shot are both utility-based. However, Improved Pet Mend is related to pet management and survival. Next, the only way a player could reach the node Beast Master (which increases the pet’s damage) by taking either Improved Tranq Shot or Binding Shackles —and yet once again, I find it odd that for a player to reach more pet-related nodes, they can only reach it through taking utility-related nodes.

When I looked at the other side of the class tree, I noticed that the rightmost path seemed to go back and forth between shot-based damage and survival nodes. This path starts with Kill Shot and Improved Kill Shot, but then it switches to Natural Mending (shortens the cooldown on Exhilaration), Camouflage, and Survival of the Fittest? The next node a player could take on this path is Born to be Wild (shortens the cooldown of speed and damage reduction talents)… then finally a player could start speccing into damage-boosting nodes once again with Master Marksman, which is required for Explosive Shot/Barrage and Serpent Sting.

I find it an odd choice to place survival nodes in the same path as damage nodes, especially when I compare it to the other class trees — for example, on the Druid class tree, there are very clear, separate paths for healing spells, damage spells, beast attacks (cat and bear), utility nodes, and PvP-based nodes.

The middle of the Hunter class tree is also odd to me — for example, in order to reach the Keen Eyesight node (which increases crit by 2%/4%), a player must take either Binding Shackles (utility) or Agile Movement (increased running speed). In order to take these nodes, a player must spec into either trap nodes or utility nodes (those specific utilities are commonly used in PvP). Why would a player be required to spec into PvP abilities in order to get to a node that benefits players in both PvP and PvE setting?

Now, I always believe in giving credit where credit is due: For the most part, I find the themes in the Hunter class tree to be pretty solid! There’s the pet nodes, there’s the utility nodes (including the trap nodes), and there’s the “special shot” nodes. The tree is pretty strong when it comes to establishing the Hunter identity — it’s just the placements that doesn’t really make sense, and the pathing can be rather odd.

Of course, there’s the whole thing where a player could take Improved Tranq Shot without taking Tranq Shot, or take Binding Shackles without taking Binding Shot or Intimidation. That needs to get fixed. :slight_smile:

Now, let’s go to the spec trees! (Edit: Originally, I was going to talk about all three specs, but then I decided to only do MM in this post, since it’s already a… long… post. I will discuss BM and SV another day.)


Thoughts on the MM Tree

I noticed that in the MM tree, a player could take Razor Fragments, which affects Trick Shots, without taking Trick Shots. Yes, Razor Fragments also works with Deathblow (which is a requirement for unlocking Razor Fragments), but it is still a little odd to be able to reach Razor Fragments before reaching Trick Shots.

Likewise, a player could take five nodes affecting Rapid Fire without taking Rapid Fire itself — in part because these nodes are located on the middle or the right side of the tree whereas Rapid Fire is on the left side:

  • Focused Aim (increases Rapid Fire damage by 5%/10%)
  • Hunter’s Knowledge (increases crit chance of Rapid Fire by 5%10%)
  • Deathblow (Rapid Fire have a 10% chance to grant Kill Shot)
  • Double Tap (which essentially doubles Rapid Fire during the duration)
  • Trueshot Aura (reduces cooldown of Rapid Fire during the duration)

I also identified seven nodes which affects Multi-Shot — and a player could take six without ever taking Multi-Shot. They are:

  • Precise Shots (Aimed Shot boosting the damage of Multi-Shot by 35%/70%)

  • True Aim (increases damage of Multi-Shot by 25%)

  • Lethal Shots (Multi-Shot have a 30% chance of reducing Rapid Fire cooldown)

  • Calling the Shots (Multi-Shot reduces the cooldown of Trueshot Aura by 1.5/3 seconds)

  • Bombardment (Every 6/3 Arcane Shot/Chimera Shot grants Multi-Shot the ability to trigger Trick Shots regardless of number of targets)

  • Salvo (every 45 seconds, Multi-Shot will also cast Explosive Shot)

Now, I will grant that most of those Rapid Fire-affecting and Multi-Shot-affecting nodes also affect Aimed Shot or Arcane Shot or Chimera Shot — for the most part. But two of these nodes cannot function without Multi-Shot: Bombardment and Salvo. Those two nodes are utterly pointless if a player doesn’t have access to Multi-Shot. Players can reach these nodes by pathing through Deathblow, Razor Fragments, and Volley — thereby bypassing Multi-Shot. (Which also results in a player missing out on Trick Shots, since Multi-Shot unlocks Trick Shots.)

A player could easily miss Multi-Shot, since Multi-Shot is erroneously placed in a circle-shaped node, as opposed to a square-shaped node. A player who isn’t paying attention could easily miss out on Multi-Shot, and path all the way down to Salvo… without ever taking Multi-Shot.

I think the issues with Rapid Fire and Multi-Shot could be easily solved by Blizzard moving those two up to the first tier — right below Aimed Shot. When one looks at the other classes’ spec trees, one would notice that many of those trees have abilities right up in the beginning, so those abilities are the first thing that a player grabs before getting nodes which improves on the said ability. By putting Rapid Fire and Multi-Shot right under Aimed Shot, Blizzard could ensure that a player grabs Rapid Fire and Multi-Shot before they unlock all the nodes which improves those two abilities.

If Rapid Fire and Multi-Shot are left in their current location, then the pathing doesn’t make sense — the nodes which affect Rapid Fire are scatted all over the tree, and likewise with Multi-Shot. This is how a player could take five nodes affecting Rapid Fire without taking Rapid Fire, or six nodes affecting Multi-Shot without taking Multi-Shot.

However, it’s not all doom and gloom — despite the odd placement of some nodes, and pathing issues, I find the themes to be pretty clear and solid in the MM tree. It’s obviously the tree for “fancy shooting” and “sniping.” The nodes are pretty distinct and does fit the MM flavor quite nicely.


Closing Thoughts and Concerns

As you can see, the Hunter trees do indeed suffer from “bloat” — they are expensive with their high number of multiple-point nodes, and they have some unusual node placements which enables a player to spec into numerous nodes affecting an ability… without ever taking the said ability. Also, some paths can be a little confusing; for example, one path starts out as a damage path, then abruptly switches over to a survival/utility path, before reverting back to damage. Or there’s the pet path which suddenly changes into a trap/utility path, and then changes back into a pet path near the end. There are several examples of this throughout all the trees.

There are a few more things I want to discuss, but this post is already super long as it is! So I’ll stop for now, and continue tomorrow or on Wednesday. :slight_smile:

Up next will be my thoughts about the BM and SV trees — but in the meanwhile, there are some really excellent feedback threads on these specs over in the Hunter forum. I’ll share them so you can take a look until I post about BM and SV.

BM Feedback thread: [Feedback - Build 44999] Hunter Class Talents + Beast Mastery

SV Feedback thread: [DF] Hunter Class and Survival Talent Tree Feedback

SV Feedback thread: Alpha Survival Hunter Questions for the Developers

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The Nitty Gritty: Class and Spec Trees

In this post, you will see the numbers for the following:

Tier 1
Tier 2
Tier 3
Total
Percentage of multiple-point nodes in each tree

I have included the numbers for “choice” nodes and multiple-point nodes (I separately counted the two-point nodes and the three-point nodes). Feel free to open each section of your own choosing.

Warrior trees

Warrior Class Tree
Tier 1: 18 nodes, with 3 choices
Tier 2: 12 nodes, with 5 choices
Tier 3: 15 nodes, with 3 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 45 nodes, with 11 choices and 4 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 9%

Protection Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes
Tier 2: 17 nodes, with 6 choices and 1 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 1 choice and 3 two-point nodes
Total: 38 nodes, with 7 choices and 4 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 11%

Fury Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 1 choice
Tier 2: 20 nodes, with 2 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 15 nodes, with 1 choice and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 45 nodes, with 2 choices and 6 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 13%

Arms Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes
Tier 2: 11 nodes, with 2 choices and 1 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 21 nodes, with 3 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Total: 42 nodes, with 5 choices and 4 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 10%

Rogue trees

Rogue Class Tree
Tier 1: 13 nodes
Tier 2: 19 nodes, with 6 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 13 nodes, with 3 two-point nodes and 2 three-point nodes
Total: 45 nodes, with 11 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 24%

Subtlety Tree
Tier 1: 13 nodes
Tier 2: 20 nodes, with 3 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 3 two-point nodes
Total: 44 nodes, with 6 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 14%

Assassination Tree
Tier 1: 9 nodes, with 5 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 16 nodes, with 2 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 1 choice, 1 two-point node and 3 three-point nodes
Total: 38 nodes with 1 choice and 11 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 29%

Outlaw Tree
Tier 1: 12 nodes
Tier 2: 20 nodes, with 3 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 2 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Total: 43 nodes, with 2 choices and 6 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 19%

Mage trees

Mage Class Tree
Tier 1: 14 nodes, with 4 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 4 choices, 5 two-point nodes and 2 three-point nodes
Tier 3: 9 nodes, with 1 choice and 3 three-point nodes
Total: 37 nodes, with 5 choices and 15 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 38%

Frost Tree
Tier 1: 11 nodes
Tier 2: 13 nodes, with 3 choices, 4 two-point nodes and 2 three-point nodes
Tier 3: 14 nodes, with 1 choice and 5 two-point nodes
Total: 38 nodes, with 4 choices and 11 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 29%

Arcane Tree
Tier 1: 9 nodes, with 2 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 16 nodes
Tier 3: 14 nodes, with 2 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 41 nodes, with 2 choices and 6 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 15%

Fire Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 1 choice
Tier 2: 15 nodes, with 3 choices and 6 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 1 choice and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 37 nodes, with 5 choices and 10 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 27%

Druid trees

Druid Class Tree
Tier 1: 18 nodes, with 2 three-point nodes
Tier 2: 16 nodes, with 1 choice and 4 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 2 choices, 2 two-point nodes and 1 three-point node
Total: 46 nodes, with 3 choices and 9 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 20%

Balance Tree
Tier 1: 9 nodes, with 3 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 11 nodes, with 5 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 14 nodes, with 7 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 34 nodes, with 7 choices and 12 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 35%

Feral Tree
Tier 1: 9 nodes, with 1 choice, 2 two-point nodes and 2 three-point nodes
Tier 2: 11 nodes, with 2 three-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 3 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 33 nodes, with 4 choices and 10 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 30%

Restoration Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 4 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 10 nodes, with 1 choice, 4 two-point nodes and 1 three-point node
Tier 3: 16 nodes, with 5 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Total: 36 nodes, with 6 choices and 12 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 33%

Guardian Tree
Tier 1: 12 nodes, with 1 choice and 1 two-point node
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 5 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 5 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Total: 38 nodes, with 6 choices and 9 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 24%

Evoker trees

Evoker Class Tree
Tier 1: 16 nodes, with 1 choice and 2 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 15 nodes, with 6 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 15 nodes, with 1 choice and 1 two-point node
Total: 46 nodes, with 2 choices and 9 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 20%

Preservation Tree
Tier 1: 9 nodes
Tier 2: 15 nodes, with 3 choices, 5 two-point nodes and 1 three-point node
Tier 3: 13 nodes, with 1 choice and 3 two-point nodes
Total: 39 nodes, with 4 choices and 9 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 23%

Devastation Tree
Tier 1: 11 nodes, with 1 choice and 3 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 13 nodes, with 2 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 2 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 36 nodes, with 5 choices and 10 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 28%

Warlock trees

Warlock Class Tree
Tier 1: 17 nodes, with 1 choice and 5 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 3 choices and 5 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 4 two-point nodes
Total: 42 nodes, with 4 choices and 14 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 33%

Affliction Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 4 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 11 nodes, with 2 choices and 5 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 16 nodes, with 5 two-point nodes
Total: 37 nodes, with 2 choices and 14 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 38%

Demonology Tree
Tier 1: 13 nodes, with 2 choices
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 7 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 13 nodes, with 1 choice and 5 two-point nodes
Total: 40 nodes, with 3 choices and 12 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: *30%
Special note: PIT LORD!?

Destruction Tree
Tier 1: 13 nodes, with 5 choices and 1 two-point node
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 9 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 1 choice and 6 two-point nodes
Total: 39 nodes, with 6 choices and 16 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 41%

Priest trees

Priest Class Tree
Tier 1: 20 nodes, with 1 choice and 6 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 16 nodes, with 2 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 6 two-point nodes
Total: 48 nodes, with 1 choice and 14 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 29%

Shadow Tree
Tier 1: 14 nodes, with 2 choices and 1 two-point node
Tier 2: 16 nodes, with 1 choice and 2 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 2 choices, 5 two-point nodes and 2 three-point nodes
Total: 42 nodes, with 5 choices and 10 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 24%
Special note: Mirror Image!?

Discipline Tree
Tier 1: 11 nodes, with 1 choice and 1 two-point node
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 5 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 15 nodes, with 2 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Total: 40 nodes, with 3 choices and 9 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 23%

Holy Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes
Tier 2: 13 nodes, with 2 choices and 1 two-point node
Tier 3: 13 nodes, with 1 choice and 6 two-point nodes
Total: 36 nodes, with 3 choices and 7 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 19%

Death Knight trees

Death Knight Class Tree
Tier 1: 20 nodes, with 1 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 12 nodes, with 2 choices
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 3 three-point nodes
Total: 44 nodes, with 2 choices and 4 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 9%

Frost Tree
Tier 1: 9 nodes, with 2 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 4 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 10 nodes, with 1 choice and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 35 nodes, with 5 choices and 8 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 29%

Blood Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 1 two-point node and 2 three-point nodes
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 3 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 4 two-point nodes
Total: 36 nodes, with 3 choices and 11 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 31%
Special note: BOOOOONESTOOOOOORM!

Unholy Tree
Tier 1: 9 nodes, with 2 three-point nodes
Tier 2: 15 nodes, with 2 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 10 nodes, with 4 two-point nodes
Total: 34 nodes, with 2 choices and 10 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 29%

Paladin trees

Paladin Class Tree
Tier 1: 12 nodes, with 1 choice and 1 two-point node
Tier 2: 16 nodes, with 2 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 13 nodes, with 3 choices and 4 three-point nodes
Total: 41 nodes, with 6 choices and 8 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 20%

Retribution Tree
Tier 1: 11 nodes
Tier 2: 20 nodes, with 7 choices and 2 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 1 choice and 5 two-point nodes
Total: 43 nodes, with 8 choices and 7 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 16%

Holy
Tier 1: 9 nodes with 1 choice and 2 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 15 nodes with 1 choice, 3 two-point nodes and 1 three-point node
Tier 3: 15 nodes, with 2 choices
Total: 39 nodes, with 5 choices and 6 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 15%

Protection Tree
Tier 1: 11 nodes, with 2 choices
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 1 choice and 6 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 3 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 36 nodes, with 6 choices and 10 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 28%

Shaman trees

Shaman Class Tree
Tier 1: 22 nodes, with 4 choices and 1 two-point node
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 4 choices and 6 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 13 nodes, with 3 choices and 4 two-point nodes
Total: 49 nodes, with 11 choices and 11 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 22%

Elemental Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 4 choices
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 2 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 16 nodes, with 5 choices and 7 two-point nodes
Total: 40 nodes, with 11 choices and 10 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 25%

Enhancement Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 1 choice and 1 two-point node
Tier 2: 17 nodes, with 3 choices and 2 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 1 choice and 5 two-point nodes
Total: 38 nodes, with 5 choices and 8 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 21%

Restoration Tree
Tier 1: 14 nodes, with 2 choices and 3 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 13 nodes, with 5 choices and 1 two-point node
Tier 3: 13 nodes, with 3 choices and 5 two-point nodes
Total: 40 nodes, with 10 choices and 9 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 23%

Hunter trees

Hunter Class Tree
Tier 1: 12 nodes, with 4 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 3 choices and 5 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 5 choices and 5 two-point nodes
Total: 38 nodes, with 8 choices and 14 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 37%

Beast Mastery
Tier 1: 12 nodes, with 6 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 12 nodes, with 1 choice, 5 two-point nodes and 1 three-point node
Tier 3: 11 nodes, with 2 choices, 5 two-point nodes and 1 three-point node
Total: 35 nodes, with 3 choices and 18 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 51%

Survival Tree
Tier 1: 10 nodes, with 2 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 1 choice and 8 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 5 two-point nodes and 1 three-point node
Total: 36 nodes, with 1 choice and 16 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point: 44%

Marksmanship Tree
Tier 1: 11 nodes, with 6 two-point nodes
Tier 2: 14 nodes, with 1 choice and 2 two-point nodes
Tier 3: 12 nodes, with 2 choices and 5 two-point nodes
Total: 37 nodes, with 3 choices and 13 multiple-point nodes
Percentage of nodes that are multiple-point nodes: 35%

…yes, my hand hurt quite a bit jotting down all of this…

48 Likes

Mastery is fine for BM & MM, however the team should really consider tweaking Survival’s Mastery effect. It would be a shame to go another expansion with a secondary stat that is practically useless. I understand the attempt to prevent the Mastery from being a strictly better/worse Versatility by having it affect all damaging abilities, but tying it to Focus spending abilities is not impactful enough, especially when you keep adding abilities that do not cost Focus (why is Fury of the Eagle free??).

Thinking about Survival’s core rotational abilities in Dragonflight, you have Raptor Strike/Mongoose Bite, Wildfire Bomb, Kill Command, and Kill Shot. While these are not all “mandatory”, they are as close to mandatory as it gets. Of these, only Raptor Strike/Mongoose Bite and Kill Shot are affected by Mastery. There are some additional abilities in the Class tree, some affected by Mastery and others not, but I will mostly ignore those since they are such a small part of Survival’s damage profile.

In the Survival tree, players can also talent into Carve/Butchery, Flanking Strike, and Fury of the Eagle. Carve/Butchery are affected by Mastery, but historically Carve has been a vehicle for using more Wildfire Bombs and its damage is negligible. If Butchery were to make a triumphant return, this would make Mastery slightly better. However, Flanking Strike and Fury of the Eagle both do not cost Focus and thus are not affected by Mastery. Flanking Strike is understandable, since its mainly used to generate focus. Fury of the Eagle makes no sense not being affected by Mastery.

Mastery is clearly useless for Survival hunters in retail right now due to the tier set and how much of our damage profile is Wildfire Bomb/Kill Command. Going into Dragonflight, it will continue to be bad on multi-target scenarios due to how much of our damage comes from Wildfire Bomb, in addition to Fury of the Eagle looking like an AoE-centric ability that is also not affected by Mastery. Mastery is so bad for AoE that it would probably be a buff to add a Focus cost to Wildfire Bomb and Fury of the Eagle. Think about how backwards that sounds - it would be a buff to add a resource cost to an ability.

The only time where Survival Mastery is worth considering is for strictly single target scenarios where we are leaning into Raptor Strike/Mongoose Bite as our primary source of damage. This has happened in the past, but Mastery was still never our best stat and for some reason it was nerfed going from BfA to Shadowlands.

26 Likes

While I don’t agree with everything in this link, it did bring up an extremely good point that I’m surprised hasn’t been mentioned much at all.

" 1.) Would there be any possible way to reimburse the talent point spent on Raptor Strike that we forfeit in gaining Mongoose Bite? Can we make it a Class Ability?

I cannot find another spec that is forced to pay for their main (only) spender and then pay again to replace that mandatory point. Which means SV has a tree that only gets 29 talent points in reality… For example. Retribution Paladins don’t even have to pay for their 3 core rotational abilities, Crusaders Strike, Judgement, Templars Verdict. Or their Execute."

Could Raptor Strike be moved to a baseline class ability much like Arcane or Steady Shot? I recall the rational for those being added baseline is “because you don’t forget how to shoot a bow” but it’s not like smacking things with a spear takes much skill either.

Perhaps Tip of the Spear could be moved up to the level 10 spot. I do realize that you aren’t “forced” to buy Mongoose Bite and thus effectively lose an extra point but after a quick peruse of other spec trees I didn’t see any other ability that upgraded a previous talent point and thus removed the talent point you spent earlier.

What does everyone else think about this? I hope it’s not too late in development to look at this.

12 Likes

I mean, you’re upgrading baseline ability.
If instead of getting MB it said “your raptor strike now does X” would that change anything ?

3 Likes

Very good point and very true! I still think Raptor Strike should be baseline to the spec.

3 Likes

I mean, it kind of is ?
Same as BM with Barbed and MM with aimed.

Also very true, good talk friend. :blue_heart:

1 Like

I see on the baseline Monk tree that they have a passive aura buff that can give nearby allies up to 4% Leech and/or 4% avoidance.

Didn’t we lose our personal, self-only 4% avoidance → Dodge because it would be too much with Sentinel’s Wisdom? On the build just now Sentinel’s Wisdom doesn’t even seem to impact Avoidance/Leech anymore.

Any chance Hunter’s Agility could be reverted or something so it’s not Dodge only?

5 Likes

From today’s update notes:

  • Class Tree
    • Improved Traps now also reduces cooldown of Steel Trap.
    • Removed connection between Rejuvenating Winds and Improved Tranquilizing Shot.
    • Added a connection between Tranquilizing Shot and the Intimidation/Explosive Trap choice node.
    • Lone Survivor’s cooldown reduction has been lowered 30 seconds (was 60 seconds).
    • Death Chakram now increases all damage taken instead of just physical damage taken.
  • Marksmanship
    • The talent locations of Lone Wolf and Killing Blow have been swapped.
    • The talent locations of Black Arrow and Legacy of the Windrunners have been swapped.
    • Legacy of the Windrunners changed from 1 rank to 2 ranks. Each rank adds 3 potential arrows. Bonuses to Aimed Shot now also apply to these bonus Wind Arrows.
    • Windrunner’s Guidance changed from 2 ranks to 1 rank. It now also guarantees a critical strike for the Wind Arrows, and increases their critical strike damage up by 50%.
    • Salvo now works with Volley or Multi-Shot.
    • Bombardment changed to a 1 rank talent and is now right below Multi-Shot.
    • New Talent: Bulletstorm – Extra ricochet targets from Trick Shots grants a stacking buff to Multi-Shot damage.
    • Calling the Shots has had its design adjusted to grant cooldown reduction for Trueshot from Focus Spent, rather than require specific shots.
    • Improved Arcane Shot has been to renamed Crack Shot.
10 Likes

Improved Traps - what about Hi-Explosive Trap? Can Improved Traps also reduce the cooldown of Hi-Explosive Trap?

Improved Mend Pet - can MM hunters get better access to this ability for PVP without having to spend point in Kill Command?

4 Likes

Lots of great changes this week. I think the positioning of the talents within the MM tree is in a significantly better place now. Here’s some more feedback:

MM Tree

  • The top third of the tree is far too expensive. While not literally mandatory, every talent in the first three rows with the exception of Chimaera Shot (Aimed Shot, Cracked Shot, Improved Steady Shot, Precise Shots, Rapid Fire, and Lone Wolf) is going to be selected in 99% of scenarios. That is already 8 points spent without spending a single point in the 4th row, where you need to take at least 2 more points to even have access to the middle third of the tree (and in most scenarios, you will certainly spend more than 2 points in this row). My suggestions:
    • Improved Steady Shot is changed to baseline. While the other two hunter specs would gain this, they still would not use Steady Shot as a means to generate Focus.
    • Crack Shot and Precise Shots are changed to 1 point nodes. Crack Shot is inexcusable being a 2 point node. Again, this only exists because Arcane Shot is baseline for all specs and this was needed to reduce the cost for MM specifically. Precise Shots also does not make sense being a 2 point talent, as all the 2nd point does is increase damage. Two points might be acceptable if the damage was the same per point, but the 1st point affected one shot while the 2nd point affected two shots.
  • There are too many talents that are strictly % modifiers. While there are places for these talents, they are rather unexciting and do nothing to enhance gameplay. MM has Killing Blow, Hunter’s Knowledge, True Aim, Focused Aim, and Sharpshooter. These talents would be much more interesting if they also included a component that affected your gameplay. For example, Hunter’s Knowledge (Aimed Shot/Rapid Fire crit chance) could also include the MKII Gyroscopic Stabilizer legendary effect from Legion, allowing every other Aimed Shot to be castable while moving.
  • There’s no meaningful choice for the Unerring Vision/Eagletalon’s True Focus choice node. You are simply going to choose whichever talent provides more throughput. Swapping Eagletalon’s True Focus with Calling the Shots would provide a more meaningful choice, where the player can decide between a longer CD, more powerful Trueshot vs a shorter CD, less powerful Trueshot.
  • Wind Arrows from Legacy of the Windrunners are not buffed by Careful Aim, which I hope is a bug. It is also disappointing that Careful Aim is not part of a choice node, where the other option would buff Aimed Shot damage below 20%.
  • Dead Eye would probably make more sense being located near the other Kill Shot talents, although I am not sure how you would re-organize the tree to make that work. Regardless, Dead Eye is still a dead talent because granting a second charge of Kill Shot does not do much in most situations. If this also reduced the cooldown of Kill Shot, it might be more enticing to take.
  • Razor Fragments is a cool talent, but why must it be restricted to Deathblow Procs or Trick Shots. Would it be too strong if it simply affected all Kill Shots?

Class Tree

  • This week’s change to Sentinel’s Wisdom is underwhelming. Tying the damage reduction to a specific school of magic is far too niche. Sure, this will be great for the last boss of the first raid (which does all Nature damage), but I don’t understand the hesitation to give hunters raid/party utility that is good outside of extremely niche scenarios. Pet raid buffs. Party-wide Aspect of the Fox or Aspect of the Eagle. Please.
  • Hunter’s Agility is still Dodge chance. If there is no problem giving monks 4% avoidance to ALL of their allies (or leech or movement speed, mind you), why can’t hunters have 4% personal avoidance??
  • I really, truly hope the team re-considers Nesingwary’s Trapping Apparatus. Nobody wants to use Freezing/Tar Traps for throughput. If our Feign Death and Hunter’s Mark defensive conduits did not get brought over to Dragonflight (not to mention the Disengage DR artifact trait from Legion), surely the team must have decided they do not want hunters using utility abilities for defensive purposes. Why would the team then decide to keep a talent that requires the use of utility abilities for damage? There is nothing fun about this talent, and it further exacerbates the problem the class tree has with having too many active abilities. This should not be any different than the justification to remove the damage component from Sentinel/Resonating Arrow.
53 Likes

I’ll give some prelinimary feedback from my playtest today

  1. Love the spell effect change for death chakram. Much better fit and pays homage to the original chakram
  2. All the new talents feel good. Deathblow is a great spell. Is it intended to unlock both charges of killshot? I was able to use it twice whenever it procd. The only downside is that if I get a deathblow proc, it used up my charges for when a mob reached below 20% and I found most of the time it would be on cooldown.
3 Likes

Any chance Trailblazer could be changed to be disabled when you take damage instead of when you deal damage? It’s pretty rare to not deal damage for 3 seconds in PvE combat, and if it is the case then you’re probably already pretty sad because you’re running around doing nothing. As-is, this will probably be a nice talent for low-level hunters who don’t have a mount yet, or for people farming old content indoors where they can’t mount up, but that seems unnecessarily niche to me…

This is pretty much how Aspect of the Cheetah worked in WoD with the glyph, btw. Rather than dazing you, the glyph just disabled Aspect of the Cheetah when you took damage.

edit: The main point here is that I don’t think too many people will take Trailblazer because they actually want to take Trailblazer, but rather because it’s the most efficient path to things they actually want/the alternatives are equally unattractive.

26 Likes

I don’t know if you saw, but Death Chakram does have a new animation now. I know Maizou was asking about this as well.

Even as a fan of Maldraxxus and the old spell FX I quite like this one as well.

25 Likes

Beast Mastery:
The BM tree needs some help. Barbed wrath needs to be made accessible no matter which combination of capstone talents you’re going for. Having it in the center directly under BW would be my best guess.

Wild Call should also be a lot earlier in the tree, probably in the place of Kindred Spirits or Training Expert. This is one of the only talent that helps us maintain 3 stacks of Frenzy, any good BM build will want to take this talent so having it earlier in the tree would help a lot.

Class tree:
I’m repeating myself here but it would be nice to see the Kill Shot reset talents moved to the class tree instead of having the same talent in every spec tree. Its a very fun talent and could take the place of unpopular talents like Nesingwarys/Steel trap.

38 Likes

Dueling with warriors has made me come to realize hunters could use a bit more passive or active healing. Its like fighting conversion dks from MoP all over again.

Is it possible to bring back spirit bond in the class tree? Or an active like mending bandages? It would certainly fill the gaping hole that will be felt when craven strategem is no longer in our arsenal come dragonflight.

16 Likes

It goes without saying that the team has done a phenomenal job with the amount of communication and iterative change to the Hunter trees, but it would be nice to see hunter spec trees receive changes similar to the ones the Unholy DK tree received this week.

I am no Unholy expert, but the spec went from 34 → 40 nodes and all of its 3 point nodes were reduced to 2 points at most. Regardless of how these new talents are received, I view this as a huge step in the right direction and hope a similar design approach is considered for Hunters. I think there have been plenty of great suggestions for each spec regarding talents that could be added, whether they’re entirely new or returning abilities/traits/conduits from previous expansions.

As it stands, BM has 35 nodes, SV 36 nodes, and MM 38 nodes. With this upcoming Unholy change (and assuming I’ve counted correctly), the average number of nodes across specs is 38.9. Given that Hunters have more 2/3 point nodes than every other class by far, it is clear there is room to add additional talents, while keeping the overall cost of the tree the same by reducing some of the unnecessary multi-point talents (hello Crack Shot).

38 Likes

have a good weekend, everyone :smiling_face_with_tear:

16 Likes

Happy Friday, Hunters.

Several changes will be in your next build and we wanted to share what to expect. There are also several bug fixes, and some things that were previously marked NYI are now working.

Class Tree:

  • Survival Hunters: corrected a missing connection between Kill Command and Improved Mend Pet on the class tree.
  • Alpha Predator’s value has been lowered from 30%, to 15%.
  • Improved Traps now also lowers the cooldown of Hi-Explosive Trap.
  • Stampede now snares targets hit by 30%, and you and your pets gain 10% increased critical strike chance against targets hit by your Stampede.
  • Hunter’s Agility is once again Avoidance.
  • Camouflage no longer links directly to Improved Traps. The choice node below Survival of the Fittest now links to Born to be Wild.
  • New 2-point passive talent, Serrated Shots: Serpent Sting and your bleed damage is increased by 10/20% damage. This value increases to 20/40% against targets below 30% HP.
  • New 2-point passive talent: Arctic Bola - Aimed Shot/Cobra Shot/Raptor Strike/Mongoose Bite have a chance to fling a bola out at your target that bounces 2/4 times and deals increased damage per point. Targets struck by the bola are snared by 20% for 3 sec.

Beast Mastery:

  • The top of the Beast Mastery tree has been shuffled around a bit, and now starts with Cobra Shot rather than Barbed Shot.
  • Barbed Shot damage has been increased by ~75% (this is unrelated to talents and just a change to the ability)
  • Loaded Quiver has been removed. Barbed Shot is now 2 charges always.
  • Barbed Wrath is now 1 point, down from 2. It no longer affects Aspect of the Wild.
  • Wild Call has been reduced to 1 rank.
  • Call of the Wild’s cooldown has been increased to 3 minutes.
  • The Bloody Frenzy that adjusted Barbed Shot Frenzy stack generation has been removed.
  • New 1-point talent: Brutal Companion. When Barbed Shot causes a 3rd stack of Frenzy, your pet automatically uses their special attack (Bite/Claw/Smack) with increased damage.
  • Aspect of the Wild has been redesigned.
    • Aspect of the Wild now fires a Cobra Shot at your target and another nearby target. While Aspect of the Wild is active, Cobra Shot’s Focus cost is reduced by 10, and each Cobra Shot fires a Second Cobra Shot at a nearby target.
      • New choice node below Aspect of the Wild:
        • Each temporary beast summoned reduces the cooldown of Aspect of the Wild by 5 sec.
        • Cobra Shot damage increased by 30% while Aspect of the Wild is active.
  • Several talents shifted around past the first gate due to the above changes, but the tree’s structure is very similar.

Marksmanship:

  • Dead Eye now also reduces the cooldown of Kill Shot.
  • Windrunner’s Guidance has been lowered to 25% critical strike damage bonus.
  • New choice node below Wailing Arrow:
    • Wailing Arrow resets the cooldown of Rapid Fire and grants a charge of Aimed Shot.
    • Wailing Arrow now fires 5 wind arrows at your primary target, and up to 10 split between any secondary targets.
  • Crack Shot lowered to a 1-point talent.
  • Calling the Shots and Eagletalon’s True Focus have swapped spots.

Survival

  • Coordinated Assault, Spearhead, and related talents should be working.
  • Explosive Expert tooltip updated, it has no interaction with Kill Shot and is just some cooldown reduction to Wildfire Bombs.
  • Birds of Prey has been redesigned. Kill Shot now strikes up to 3 extra targets while Coordinated Assault is active.
  • New choice node against Birds of Prey: Bombardier. The cooldown of Wildfire Bombs is reset when Coordinated Assault is activated, and when it fades.
  • Guerilla Tactics increases the initial damage of Wildfire Bombs by 50%, down from 100%.
  • Fury of the Eagle once again grants 50% critical strike chance against targets below 20% HP.
  • Ruthless Marauder increases the HP threshold for increases critical strikes by 5% per rank rather than increasing critical strike chance.

Thanks for the continued feedback and testing.
And yes, have a nice weekend everyone!

82 Likes