Workshop Disabled? Check out these alternatives!

The Workshop is disabled and we have no idea when it will be back. But that doesn’t mean you can’t still create new gamemodes. There are 4 well maintained alternatives that each have their own pros and cons. Please note that all of these are open source and completely free. Blizzard may have let us down, but the community is here to stay.

All of these require Overwatch on PC to be able to import your script in-game.


Zez’s Workshop UI recreation

https://workshop.codes/workshop-ui

By Zezombye

Difficulty: Beginner

This is a web based recreation of the original Workshop that aims to mimic the Overwatch 1 editor as close as possible. Because of that it’s very easy to get in to. It doesn’t matter how much or little experience you have with programming, a visual based UI is a great way to get started with the Workshop.

Pros

  • Web based, no set up needed.
  • Beginner friendly. No programming knowledge required to get started.
  • Many learning resources available. As it’s a recreation of the original UI any online tutorials are still very applicable.
  • Integration with Workshop.codes. Saving your projects saves them directly to your account.
  • Now with drag-and-drop for rules, actions, and conditions!

Cons

  • Limited by the same limitation as the Workshop UI.
    • Large amounts of code repetition.
    • Small changes might require tons of work.
  • Cumbersome for larger projects.

Workshop.codes Overwatch Workshop Script Editor

https://workshop.codes/editor

Demo:

https://workshop.codes/editor?uuid=40ed1447-bc63-4983-9662-840f7707e269

By Workshop.codes

Difficulty: Easy

This is a web based editor that allows you to write using the Workshop syntax, but with all the features you’d expect in other languages. Autocomplete, syntax highlighting, separate files and folders, etc. This script editor uses the exact Workshop script your get from copy pasting your scripts in-game. If you are already familiar with the Workshop this will make it easy enough to continue where you left off. It builds off of the usual script by adding Mixins, allowing you to easily re-use code efficiently. And a built-in Wiki for good measure.

Pros

  • Familiar syntax if you know the Workshop
  • Web based, no set up needed.
  • Syntax Highlighting, Autocomplete, intellisense, etc.
  • Seperate files and folders for better code organization.
  • Mixins allow for efficient re-using of code.
  • Integrated Wiki makes learning much easier.
  • Integration with Workshop.codes. Saving your projects saves them directly to your account.

Cons

  • Syntax cumbersome to write
  • Error handling is limited

OverPy

https://github.com/Zezombye/overpy

By Zezombye

Difficulty: Intermediate

OverPy is a Highlevel language that uses a Python-like syntax. OverPy uses a VS Code extension to easily integrate in your already existing development environment. OverPy is a wrapper around the workshop, allowing you to code your gamemodes with modern development practices and break the limitations of the workshop UI with features such as multiple files, macros, switches, enums, optimizations, string splitting, better syntax, etc.

Pros

  • Works in your already existing development environment in VS Code
  • Syntax Highlighting, Autocomplete, intellisense, etc.
  • Seperate files and folders for better code organization.
  • Macros, switches, enums, and more features you’re used to from fully fledged languages.
  • Easy optimize your code.
  • Extensive Wiki to make learning much easier.

Cons

  • Some programming experience is highly recommended.
  • Some of the syntax can be a bit ugly.
  • If you don’t already know the Workshop starting with OverPy will be difficult.
  • Requires some set up if you’re not already using VS Code.

Deltin’s Script To Workshop

https://github.com/ItsDeltin/Overwatch-Script-To-Workshop

By Deltin

Difficulty: Advanced

OSTW is a Highlevel language with a C# like syntax and uses many concepts similar to those found in well known programming languages. Such as data collections in the form of structs or classes, functions, loops, enums, switches, lambdas, and more. OSTW uses a VS Code extension to integrate in to your already existing development environment. If you are an experienced programmer looking to push the Workshop to it’s limits, OSTW is your best bet.

Pros

  • Many features you’re used to from well known languages
  • Works in your already existing development environment in VS Code
  • Syntax Highlighting, Autocomplete, intellisense, etc.
  • Built-in Pathfinding tools
  • Write better maintainable code by using type declarations, classes, etc.

Cons

  • Hard to get in to if you are not an experienced programmer or if you are new to the Workshop.
  • If you don’t already know the Workshop starting with OSTW will be difficult.
  • Requires some set up if you’re not already using VS Code.
  • Updates to the Workshop can be slow to be added to OSTW.

Ultimately what tool your choose is completely up to you, there is no right or wrong choice. Each tool supports importing or decompiling from Workshop Script, so if you ever choose you want to swap to a different tool you can swap without too much effort.

7 Likes

Hey I’m currently working on an alternative would you mind including my project to your list?

Github

1 Like

Bumping this thread to the top.

Hey this is very cool! Love the node based building. Is it complete or still work in development?

it’s complete in the sense that you can make custom game modes out of it I do want to add more to it

A possible idea (since it’s running on OpenGL) I’m thinking of is also adding a node that has maybe a button to a 3d viewport that will let you build a mesh using the in game effects (I’ve seen a few game modes do this)