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#102

Not all corporations and businesses are what you say. Additionally, I don’t and have never advocated poor treatment of employees or customers.

If a company has committed a crime, there are laws and protections in place and by all means we should all hold them to the fire if we can. If a company made poor decisions, or is a victim of poor economies or detrimental competition and has to lay off, this is a part of the working life. I’m not going to ever assume there can be a noncompetitive business world that is perfect.


#103

The executive bonus was to find a NEW CFO to join to clean up the mess left by the previous CFO. Do you know many people who like to go into a job cleaning up someone else’s mess?


#104

I mean, it only takes a few greedy ppl running things to ruin it for everyone. The bigger a business gets the worse it tends to get too. Businesses behave a lot better when their liveliehood is tied to the communities they serve.


#105

Peace out. Life’s too short to be on here doing this.

I appreciate the conversation. I’ve learned something today.


#106

American business has always taken the easy route of laying off people to prop up profitability while working everyone else to death. Currently US wage growth has been stagnant for years now while costs continue to rise and we are losing out so a few can live lavish lifestyles. The only way to get ahead now is to keep changing jobs as the only way you can get more income - but you then lose out on 401K, etc. Something like at least 10% of CEO’s truly show psychopathy, and the percentage across all ranks is probably less but its definitely there.

EDIT: This is not just a US problem, but its most prominent right now.


#107

I think they fall from that pinnacle the day when Diablo 3 was in my hands…


#108

The way you said it makes me think you learned the wrong things but I at least appreciate the courtesy.

The thing is you can be for moral business practices, but companies frequently if it’s the law or not, either get away with very little detriment to them or completely away with it. I mean, look how hard it is to actually convict a corporation of anything. Stories like Erin Brockovich are a lot more common than they should be, Flint still doesn’t have good water, Nestle goes to third world countries and takes up all their water and moves on to the great detriment of locals, before unions being a worker was a lot like the David Copperfield novel, which Charles Dickens himself actually was a child laborer in a factory. Industries still dump waste into water systems. It’s not like these views come from nowhere they were earned.

Now income equality is at an all time high, studies have shown even ancient Egypt didn’t have as much disparity in income inequality as there is today. So the people aren’t happy, they know they have been screwed but not all of them are smart enough to know by who so are are open for manipulation with misinformation.

You seem to have your morals in a good place, but that doesn’t mean we should assume businesses do, they’ve proven they often do not.


#109

Well, that is how employment works. The worker is compensated for their time and effort.


#110

The Japanese can be great like that. They actually understand that their actions in their products reflect what they are as a company. That’s why you never see Japanese products that are all flimsy like Corporate America products, because they care about reputation over there.


#111

Ooh, I vote cleaning lady!


#112

Man of culture! Those indie devs are probably the best people to work for/with. The big companies have a lot of issues right now.

Also I cant wait for Team Cherry releasing Silksong. It looks just so damn good! :smiley:


#113

Lol, same. There are times I feel a great deal of satisfaction just cleaning up after other thoughtless messes.


#114

i highly doubt they fired them because of money

its most likely because those workers didn’t have anything to do, why pay people to not do anything?


#115

While I do agree with your sentiment I think the reflection of blizz’ choices are pretty obvious by now, they had too many people doing too much stuff outside of game developing and for a gaming company that’s a bit… preposterous

Take all of those hasbro, kellogs and lego deals, someone is responsible for signing all of those up and sadly I think not many people are interested in those products, for most overwatch players the toys and whatnot are a bit cringy at best, it’s just a weird approach that was probably approved by someone who isn’t young and whose marketing practices are based on the 90’s

That guy probably got the chop and everyone who worked on these products too, it’s sad because they are quality products however the monetary return is probably minimal and as such it’s basically throwing money down the drain


#116

Stop acting like you know the whole story. My friend works at blizzard and he loves it.


#117

Sir, this is an Arby’s.

I have never wanted to work for Activision-Blizzard… I’ve also never wanted to work at Nintendo. Nor EA for that matter.

If you want to apply to work at Nintendo, they have a page for that. I’m not sure what ranting here is supposed to accomplish.


#118

Not really. Tokyo maybe. But when I went they are very much about keeping Japan Japanese. My brother tells me that they are very particular about keeping their ways. He’s lived there for a few years now so I’m going to trust him on it.


#119

Well it depends what you mean by “so prideful they refuse to accept outside cultures and ideas”
When you go to Japan you can see a huge impact made by western culture: clothes, fashion, media, architecture, food, to mention only a few. Here’s a small excerpt from a historical text:

After the Meiji Restoration, the West was taken as the supreme model for nearly every significant aspect of life, and many insignificant ones too. Popular assemblies, government bureaus, schools, the banking system, clothes for policemen and military men, and the pre-1945 constitution, all were based on one or other Western examples. Hair for both men and women was re-styled according to European fashion; beer was brewed as an alternative to sake; beefsteak, baseball, and the cravat were considered smart.

The very business model you were criticising for being unable to accept foreign ideas or influences is itself a foreign influence that has been assimilated.

The country still has a very strong cultural identity, yes, and they work hard at keeping that alive. To call an entire country overly prideful to the point of rejecting anything non-Japanese though, it’s just simply not true.